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How to prevent the infection of contaminated abdominal incisions

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Preventing infection of the incision is particularly important.

OBJECTIVE:

To discuss how to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infection after contaminated abdominal surgery.

METHODS:

Five hundred and fifty-one surgery patients with ``contaminated abdominal incisions'' from January 2011 to May 2013 were analyzed in terms of the preventative treatment, and summarized for surgical site infection. Subcutaneous tissue flushed with normal saline + hydrogen peroxide before suturing in the intervention 1 group; subcutaneous tissue flushed with normal saline + 0.5% povidone-iodine before suturing in the intervention 2 group.

RESULTS:

When subcutaneous fat was contaminated to a depth of ≤ 2.5 cm, the rates of surgical site infection in the control group and the intervention groups showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). When subcutaneous fat was contaminated to a depth of ≥ 3.0 cm, the rate of surgical site infection in the control group compared with the intervention one group was not statistically different (P > 0.05). The rate of surgical site infection in the control group compared with the intervention two group was statistical significant (P < 0.05). The rate of surgical site infection in the intervention one group compared with the intervention two group was statistical significant (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Preoperative control of the blood sugar; correction of anemia and the hypoalbuminemia; use of intraoperative the high-frequency electrotome; irrigation of the incision with plenty of physiological saline +$ iodophor before suturing the subcutaneous fat layer were key to effectively preventing infection in contaminated abdominal incisions.

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